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monitorix.conf.5


Manual Reference Pages  - monitorix.conf (5)

NAME

monitorix.conf - Configuration file for Monitorix.

CONTENTS

Description
Configuration Options
     Built-in HTTP server
     Built-in HTTP server with access authentication
     Log files pathnames
     Enable or disable graphs
     System load average and usage (system.rrd)
     Global kernel usage (kern.rrd)
     Kernel usage per processor (proc.rrd)
     HP ProLiant System Health (hptemp.rrd)
     LM-Sensors and GPU temperatures (lmsens.rrd)
     NVIDIA temperatures and usage (nvidia.rrd)
     Disk drive temperatures and health (disk.rrd)
     Filesystem usage and I/O activity (fs.rrd)
     Network traffic and usage (net.rrd)
     Netstat statistics (netstat.rrd)
     System services demand (serv.rrd)
     Mail statistics (mail.rrd)
     Network port traffic (port.rrd)
     Users using the system (user.rrd)
     FTP statistics (ftp.rrd)
     Apache statistics (apache.rrd)
     Nginx statistics (nginx.rrd)
     Lighttpd statistics (lighttpd.rrd)
     MySQL statistics (mysql.rrd)
     Squid Proxy Web Cache (squid.rrd)
     NFS server statistics (nfss.rrd)
     NFS client statistics (nfsc.rrd)
     BIND statistics (bind.rrd)
     NTP statistics (ntp.rrd)
     Fail2ban statistics (fail2ban.rrd)
     Icecast Streaming Media Server (icecast.rrd)
     Raspberry Pi sensor statistics (raspberrypi.rrd)
     Alternative PHP Cache statistics (phpapc.rrd)
     Memcached statistics (memcached.rrd)
     APC UPS statistics (apcupsd.rrd)
     Wowza Media Server (wowza.rrd)
     Devices interrupt activity (int.rrd)
     Monitoring the Internet traffic of your LAN (traffacct.rrd)
     Monthly reports of Internet traffic (traffacct.rrd)
     Monitoring remote servers (Multihost)
     Automatic email reports (emailreports)
Author
Copyright
See Also

DESCRIPTION

Monitorix is a free, open source, lightweight system monitoring tool designed to monitor as many services and system resources as possible. It has been created to be used on production Linux/UNIX servers, but due to its simplicity and small size may also be used to monitor embedded devices as well.

It consists mainly of two programs: a collector, called monitorix, which is a Perl daemon that is started automatically like any other system service, and a CGI script called monitorix.cgi. Since 3.0 version Monitorix includes its own HTTP server built in, so you don’t need to install any web server to use it.

Every time monitorix is started it reads the configuration file from the path specified in the command line (using the -c option), and once checked, it creates the index.html file that will act as the Monitorix main page.

It also creates a file called <base_dir>/cgi/monitorix.conf.path that includes the absolute path of the configuration file. This file will be read by monitorix.cgi to determine the exact location of the configuration file.

CONFIGURATION OPTIONS

Blank lines are ignored, and whitespace before and after a token or value is ignored as well as tabulators, although a value can contain whitespace within. Lines which begin with a # are considered comments and ignored.

If you want to comment out a large block you can use C-style comments. A /* signals the begin of a comment block and the */ signals the end of the comment block.

If an option has multiple values their must be separated by comma.

title

A free description of the server; where it is located, the Company name, etc.

Default value: Place a Title Here

hostname

The name of the host.

Default value:

theme_color

RRDtool comes with a default white theme, and since Monitorix introduces its own black theme, you have two predefined themes to choose from.

Default value: black

refresh_rate

The refresh rate (in seconds) of the statistics web page displayed in your browser. If set to 0, page refreshing is disabled.

Default value: 150

iface_mode

The interface mode defines the manner in which data is shown in the browser. Since version 1.4.0 it has been possible to display the graphic data using plain text tables. This allows Monitorix to be used by those running screen reader software, and also simplifies automatic data processing through scripts.

The possible values are:

graph for rendered graphs.
text for plain text representation.

Default value: graph

enable_zoom

Zoom allows double clicking any graph in order to see a larger version (zoomed in). This is especially useful for seeing additional detail.

Default value: y

netstats_in_bps

This option toggles network values between bits (bps) and Bytes (Bps) per second. By default the values will be shown in Bytes per second (Bps).

Default value: n

disable_javascript_void

This option enables or disables the use of use javascript:void-URLs when opening windows with zoomed graphs. Some people likes to open links in the background by pressing the middle mouse button in Firefox, and with the default javascript:void-URLs the only they get is an empty window with nothing in it.

Default value: n

temperature_scale

This option toggles between values in Celsius or in Fahrenheit in those graphs that represent temperatures.

The possible values are:

c for Celsius.
f for Fahrenheit.

Default value: c

show_gaps

This option, when enabled, shows the gaps (missing data) in the graphs. This is specially useful to detect if the server or Monitorix were stopped for a while, or any other unavailability.

In order to be able to locate those gaps easily in each graph, it uses the white color in the default black theme and the black color in the white theme. These default colors are defined in monitorix.conf so they can be changed as any other option.

Default value: n

global_zoom

This option zooms all the graphs (including the legend’s font size) by the given amount. The factor must be greater than 0 and it accepts decimal values.

This is specially useful for people with big screens that either want to avoid using the browser feature to zoom the contents of the window and for those that watch the graphs from certain distance.

Keep in mind that the contents of the graphs remains with the same detail level all the time, and that it doesn’t affects to the standard zoomed graph that appears when clicking in the picture.

Default value: 1

max_historic_years

This option defines the maximum number of years of historical data in all graphs.

WARNING: Every time this value is extended Monitorix will resize every .rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

The maximum allowed is 5.

Default value: 1

accept_selfsigned_certs

This option forces to accept self-signed certificates when collecting values remotely using HTTPS protocol.

Default value: y

include_dir

The main configuration file is usually called monitorix.conf and its location is provided as part of the command line arguments. In addition, other configuration files may be loaded placing them in the directory pointed by this option. The names must end with .conf to be included.

This option is mainly intended to include third-party modules with their own configuration files without having to modify any file from your Monitorix installation. All modules are located in /usr/lib/monitorix (in some operating systems that path can change).

All the configuration files in there will be loaded in alphabetic order, so the last file loaded will overwrite any previous option.

Default value: /etc/monitorix/conf.d

base_dir

This is the absolute path to the directory where all the web elements are located:

cgi/ directory where resides monitorix.cgi.
imgs/ directory for the .png graph images.
index.html Monitorix main page.
logo_bot.png Monitorix bottom logo.
logo_top.png Monitorix top logo.
monitorixico.png Monitorix favicon logo.

Default value: /var/lib/monitorix/www/
(depends on the operating system)

base_lib

This is the absolute path to the directory where all of the monthly reports, daily traffic usage, and RRD files are located:

reports/ monthly reports localization directory.
usage/ daily traffic usage data directory.
*.rrd RRD files.

Default value: /var/lib/monitorix/
(depends on the operating system)

base_url

This is the URL prefix that Monitorix utilizes when refering to its own pages and files.

Default value: /monitorix

base_cgi

This is the URL prefix that Monitorix utilizes when refering to monitorix.cgi.

Default value: /monitorix-cgi

    Built-in HTTP server

enabled
This enables or disables the HTTP server that Monitorix has built-in. This is specially useful for system administrators that don’t want to install a web server (Apache, Lighttpd, Nginx, etc.) to see the Monitorix graphs.

Default value: y

host

This option takes an optional host address for this server to bind to. If none is specified (default) it will bind to all interfaces.

Default value:

port

This is the network port from where the HTTP server will listen on.

Default value: 8080

user/group

This sets the user and group that the HTTP server will run as.

Default value for user: nobody
Default value for group: nobody

log_file

This is the path to the HTTP server log file.

Default value: /var/log/monitorix-httpd

hosts_deny

This is a comma delimited set of IP addresses which are not permitted to access Monitorix graphs. There is the special keyword called all that can be used to deny all IP addresses.

The access control uses the same approach as in the TCP-Wrappers; the search stops at the first match:

        - Access will be granted when an IP address matches an entry in the hosts_allow list.
        - Otherwise, access will be denied when an IP address matches an entry in the hosts_deny list.
        - Otherwise, access will be granted.

Default value:

hosts_allow

This is the opposite of hosts_deny option. IP addresses listed here are permitted to access Monitorix graphs. There is also the special keyword called all that can be used to allow access to all IP addresses.

Default value:

https_url

This will force to use the prefix https:// in all links. This is special useful if you plan to use a reverse-proxy HTTPS server in front of the Monitorix built-in HTTP.

Default value: n

    Built-in HTTP server with access authentication

enabled
This enables or disables the authentication mechanism to control access to pages and other resources. The only allowed mechanism is Basic and uses the 401 status code and the WWW-Authenticate response header.

For more information about the Basic access authentication mechanism and its security implications, please refer to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_access_authentication.

Default value: n

msg

This option sets the Realm to be used in the authentication. That message should appear in the client dialog box to help user to identify the secure area.

Default value: Monitorix: Restricted access

htpasswd

This option sets the path to the password file that was created with the help of the htpasswd.pl script. That script encrypts and validates passwords using the system’s crypt() routine. If your Monitorix package doesn’t come with that script, you may use the similar htpasswd(1) program provided with the Apache web server.

The format of the password file consist of one or more lines with a username and password separated by a colon.

The following is an example of a password file:

paul:oGkEsQK6RYIII
peter:HF1r7qRL4Kg6E

Since the script uses the crypt() algorithm, only the first 8 characters of the password are used to form the password. If the supplied password is longer, the extra characters will be silently discarded.

Default value: /var/lib/monitorix/htpasswd

    Log files pathnames

log_file
This is the path to the Monitorix log file. Please check this file periodically and especially after every update to confirm proper operation.

Default value: /var/log/monitorix

secure_log

This is the path to the system log (also known as auth.log, etc.) Monitorix uses this file to report SSH, POP3, FTP and Telnet successful logins.

Default value: /var/log/secure

mail_log

This is the path to the mail log file. Monitorix uses this file to report messages sent (supporting Sendmail and Postfix formats), and the MailScanner log format for spam-mail and virus-mail alerts.

Default value: /var/log/maillog

milter_gl

This is the path to the dump file of milter-greylist.

Default value: /var/milter-greylist/greylist.db

imap_log

This is the path to the IMAP (Dovecot or UW-IMAP) log file. Monitorix uses this file to report IMAP and POP3 successful logins.

Default value: /var/log/imap

hylafax_log

This is the path to the Hylafax log file. Monitorix uses this file to report successful FAX dispatches.

Default value: /var/spool/hylafax/etc/xferfaxlog

cups_log

This is the path to the CUPS page log file. Monitorix uses this file to report on print jobs.

Default value: /var/log/cups/page_log

ftp_log

This is the path to the FTP server (ProFTPD, vsftpd or Pure-FTPd) log. Monitorix uses this file to report FTP successful logins and other FTP-related information.

Default value: /var/log/proftpd/access.log

fail2ban_log

This is the path to the Fail2ban log file. Monitorix uses this file to report IP addresses banned.

Default value: /var/log/fail2ban.log

spamassassin_log

This is the path to the Spamassassin log file. Monitorix uses this file to report spam-mail alerts.

Default value: /var/log/maillog

clamav_log

This is the path to the Clamav log file. Monitorix uses this file to report virus-mail alerts.

Default value: /var/log/clamav/clamav.log

cg_logdir

This is the path to the CommuniGate logs directory. Monitorix uses these files to report the number of mail messages successfully received and sent, and to report IMAP and POP3 successful logins.

Default value: /var/CommuniGate/SystemLogs/

squid_log

This is the path to the Squid log file. Monitorix uses this file to report on Squid Proxy requests.

Default value: /var/log/squid/access.log

imap_log_date_format

This is the Dovecot date format as it appears in the imap_log file.

Default value: %b %d

secure_log_date_format

This is secure_log date format.

Default value: %b %e

    Enable or disable graphs

graph_enable
This enables or disables the monitoring of each graph. Placing a y on a desired graph and restarting Monitorix will automatically create the RRD file for that graph and start gathering information according to its settings.

    System load average and usage (system.rrd)

loadavg_enabled
This section enables or disables the alert capabilities for this graph. Only the alert for the average CPU load is currently implemented. It works as follows:

The CPU load average uses the third value (the one that represents the last 15 minutes of the load average), and if it reaches the loadavg_threshold value for the interval of time defined in loadavg_timeintvl, Monitorix will execute the external alert script defined in loadavg_script.

The default Monitorix installation includes an example of a shell-script alert called monitorix-alert.sh which you can use as a base for your own script.

Default value: n

loadavg_timeintvl

This is the period of time (in seconds) that the threshold needs to be exceeded before the external alert script is executed.

Default value: 3600

loadavg_threshold

This is the value that needs to be reached or exceeded within the specified time period in loadavg_timeintvl to trigger the mechanism for a particular action, which in this case is the execution of an external alert script.

The value of this option is compared against the last 15 minutes of CPU load average.

Default value: 5.0

loadavg_script

This is the full path name of the script that will be executed by this alert.

It will receive the following three parameters:

1st - the value currently defined in loadavg_timeintvl.
2nd - the value currently defined in loadavg_threshold.
3rd - the current 15min CPU load average.

Default value: /path/to/script.sh

    Global kernel usage (kern.rrd)

Note that the VFS graph is just informative of how the kernel is balancing its tables. graph_mode
This changes the layout of the kernel usage graph, the possible values are r for a real graph, or s for a stacked graph (every line or area is stacked on top of the previous element).

Default value: r

list

This is the list of values offered in modern Linux kernels. Older Linux kernels or other Operating Systems may not have all of them. Placing a y or an n will enable or disable the value in the graph.

    Kernel usage per processor (proc.rrd)

max
This is the number of processors or cores that your system has. There is no limit, however keep in mind that every time this number is changed Monitorix will resize the proc.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: 4

graphs_per_row

This is the number of processor graphs that will be put in a row. Consider the interaction of this parameter with the size and data options (below) in order to adjust the size and number of graphs in relation to your horizontal screen size.

Default value: 2

size

This option sets the size of all processors graphs.

The possible values are:

main for 450x150 graphs.
medium for 325x150 graphs.
medium2 for 325x70 graphs.
small for 200x66 graphs.
mini for 183x66 graphs.
tiny for 110x40 graphs.

Default value: medium

DATA

This option will completely enable or disable the legend in the processor graphs.

Default value: y

    HP ProLiant System Health (hptemp.rrd)

list
This list will hold the defined temperature sensors for each graph. You must have installed the command hplog that comes with HP ProLiant System Health Application and Command Line Utilities.

Each graph has a limited number of IDs:

graph_0 up to 8 IDs.
graph_1 up to 6 IDs.
graph_2 up to 6 IDs.

The following is a configuration example of selected IDs:

# hplog -t
ID     TYPE        LOCATION      STATUS    CURRENT  THRESHOLD
 1  Basic Sensor Ambient         Normal    75F/ 24C 107F/ 42C
 2  Basic Sensor CPU (1)         Normal   104F/ 40C 179F/ 82C
 3  Basic Sensor CPU (2)         Normal   ---F/---C 179F/ 82C
 4  Basic Sensor Memory Board    Normal   ---F/---C 188F/ 87C
 5  Basic Sensor Memory Board    Normal    82F/ 28C 188F/ 87C
 6  Basic Sensor Memory Board    Normal   ---F/---C 188F/ 87C
 7  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal    89F/ 32C 192F/ 89C
 8  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   ---F/---C 192F/ 89C
 9  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal    84F/ 29C 192F/ 89C
10  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   118F/ 48C 230F/110C
11  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal    96F/ 36C 192F/ 89C
12  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal    84F/ 29C 154F/ 68C
13  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal    87F/ 31C 154F/ 68C
14  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal    89F/ 32C 156F/ 69C
15  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal    93F/ 34C 161F/ 72C
16  Basic Sensor Ambient         Normal   ---F/---C 192F/ 89C
17  Basic Sensor System Board    Normal   ---F/---C 192F/ 89C
18  Basic Sensor SCSI Backplane  Normal    32F/  0C 140F/ 60C

<list>
        graph_0 = 2, 3
        graph_1 = 1, 5, 18
        graph_2 = 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
</list>

    LM-Sensors and GPU temperatures (lmsens.rrd)

list
In this list you may specify the sensors you want to monitor with the same names as they appear in your sensors(1) command.

For example, imagine a sensors(1) output like this:

# sensors
coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Core 0:       +51.0°C  (high = +78.0°C, crit = +100.0°C) 

coretemp-isa-0001
Adapter: ISA adapter
Core 1:       +49.0°C  (high = +78.0°C, crit = +100.0°C) 

f71882fg-isa-0a00
Adapter: ISA adapter
3.3V:        +3.30 V
Vcore:       +1.21 V  (max =  +2.04 V)  
Vdimm:       +1.82 V
Vchip:       +1.38 V
+5V:         +5.00 V
12V:        +14.37 V
5VSB:        +4.33 V
3VSB:        +3.30 V
Battery:     +3.22 V
CPU:        2035 RPM
System:     1765 RPM  ALARM
Power:      2110 RPM  ALARM
Aux:        2080 RPM  ALARM
M/B Temp:   +36.00 C
CPU Temp:   +29.00 C

Then you may want to configure that list as:

<list>
        core0 = Core 0
        core1 = Core 1
        mb0 = M/B Temp
        cpu0 = CPU Temp
        fan0 = CPU
        fan1 = System
        fan2 = Power
        fan3 = Aux
        volt0 = 3.3V
        volt1 = VCore
        volt2 = Vdimm
        volt3 = Vchip
        volt4 = \+5V
        volt5 = 12V
        volt6 = 5VSB
        volt7 = 3VSB
        volt8 = Battery
        gpu0 = nvidia
</list>

Note that you need to escape the plus and minus signs in the voltage labels. It also recommended to enclose the values using double quotes.

The last one, gpu0, is set here just in case you have a supported graphics card and want to monitor its temperature. Currently only NVIDIA and ATI graphic cards are supported; with the values nvidia and ati respectively. It requires the official NVIDIA or ATI drivers.

This list has the following maximums allowed:

Up to 16 core keys (from core0 to core15).
Up to 2 mb keys (mb0 and mb1).
Up to 4 cpu keys (from cpu0 to cpu3).
Up to 9 fan keys (from fan0 to fan8).
Up to 12 volt keys (from volt0 to volt11).
Up to 9 gpu keys (from gpu0 to gpu8).

    NVIDIA temperatures and usage (nvidia.rrd)

This graph requires to have installed the official NVIDIA drivers.

max

This is the number of NVIDIA cards currently plugged in your system.

The maximum allowed is 9.

Default value: 1

    Disk drive temperatures and health (disk.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of disk drives.

list

This is a list of groups of disk drives that you want to monitor. Each group will become a graph and there may be an unlimited number of groups. You can define device names or paths to devices like /dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:11.0-scsi-0:0:0:0.

WARNING: Every time the number of groups in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the disk.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

To collect the disk drive temperatures and health the smartmontools or the hddtemp command are required.

It is recommended that you first check if either smartctl(8) or hddtemp are able to collect data from the disk drive(s) that you plan to monitor. You may test this with the following command:

# hddtemp /dev/sdb
/dev/sdb: WDC WD1600AABS-00M1A0: 48°C

If you see good results as above, you can add it to the group 0 like this:

<list>
        0 = /dev/sda, /dev/sdb
</list>

The maximum number of disk device names allowed per group is 8.

realloc_enabled

This section enables or disables one of the alert capabilities for this graph; the alert for the number of reallocated sectors in disk. It works as follows:

If the number of reallocated sectors in any of the specified disk device names reaches the realloc_threshold (the interval of time is not used here), Monitorix will execute the external alert script defined in realloc_script.

The default Monitorix installation includes an example of a shell-script alert called monitorix-alert.sh which you can use as a base for your own script.

Default value: n

realloc_timeintvl

Not used in this alert.

Default value: 0

realloc_threshold

This is the value that needs to be reached or exceeded to trigger the mechanism for a particular action, which in this case is the execution of an external alert script.

Default value: 1

realloc_script

This is the full path name of the script that will be executed by this alert.

It will receive the following three parameters:

1st - the value currently defined in realloc_timeintvl.
2nd - the value currently defined in realloc_threshold.
3rd - the current number of reallocated sectors.

Default value: /path/to/script.sh

pendsect_enabled

This section enables or disables one of the alert capabilities for this graph; the alert for the number of current pending sectors (or bad sectors) in disk. It works as follows:

If the number of current pending sectors in any of the specified disk device names reaches the pendsect_threshold (the interval of time is not used here), Monitorix will execute the external alert script defined in pendsect_script.

The default Monitorix installation includes an example of a shell-script alert called monitorix-alert.sh which you can use as a base for your own script.

Default value: n

pendsect_timeintvl

Not used in this alert.

Default value: 0

pendsect_threshold

This is the value that needs to be reached or exceeded to trigger the mechanism for a particular action, which in this case is the execution of an external alert script.

Default value: 1

pendsect_script

This is the full path name of the script that will be executed by this alert.

It will receive the following three parameters:

1st - the value currently defined in pendsect_timeintvl.
2nd - the value currently defined in pendsect_threshold.
3rd - the current number of pending sectors.

Default value: /path/to/script.sh

accept_invalid_disk

During the init stage this graph verifies that every defined device name does exist in the system. If not, then the graph disables itself.

This option changes this behavior and permits to continue working even if the device names defined doesn’t exist. Keep in mind that you will continue seeing error messages in the logfile.

Default value: n

    Filesystem usage and I/O activity (fs.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of filesystems.

list

This is a list of groups of mounted filesystems that you want to monitor. Each group will become a graph and there may be an unlimited number of groups.

WARNING: Every time the number of groups in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the fs.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Take special care to use the same name as appears in the output of the df(1) command (the swap device is a special case). An example would be:

<list>
        0 = /, swap, boot, home, /mnt/backup
</list>

The maximum number of filesystems allowed per group is 8.

desc

This list complements the list option. It basically allows you to change the name that will appear in the graph, hiding the real name of the mount point. If no association is defined, then Monitorix will display the name specified in the list option.

<desc>
        / = Root FS
        /home = My Home
        /mnt/backup = Backups
</desc>

You can define as much entries as you want.

devmap

This list complements the list option. When Monitorix is started it tries to detect automatically the device name associated to each filesystem defined in the list option in order to be able to show its I/O activity. If for any reason Monitorix failed to detect it, then you can help it using this option.

<devmap>
        /mnt/backup = /dev/cciss/c0d2p6
</devmap>

You can define as much entries as you want.

rootfs_enabled

This section enables or disables the alert capabilities for this graph. Only the alert for the root filesystem disk usage is currently implemented. It works as follows:

If the percentage of disk space used in the root filesystem reaches the rootfs_threshold value for the interval of time defined in rootfs_timeintvl, Monitorix will execute the external alert script defined in rootfs_script.

The default Monitorix installation includes an example of a shell-script alert called monitorix-alert.sh which you can use as a base for your own script.

Default value: n

rootfs_timeintvl

This is the period of time (in seconds) that the threshold needs to be exceeded before the external alert script is executed.

Default value: 3600

rootfs_threshold

This is the value that needs to be reached or exceeded within the specified time period in rootfs_timeintvl to trigger the mechanism for a particular action, which in this case is the execution of an external alert script.

The value of this option is compared to the current root filesystem disk usage.

Default value: 100

rootfs_script

This is the full path name of the script that will be executed by this alert.

It will receive the following three parameters:

1st - the value currently defined in rootfs_timeintvl.
2nd - the value currently defined in rootfs_threshold.
3rd - the current root filesystem disk usage.

Default value: /path/to/script.sh

    Network traffic and usage (net.rrd)

list
This is a comma-separated list of network interfaces that you may want to monitor. An example would be:

list = eth0, eth1

The maximum number of entries allowed is 10.

desc

This is the option where each network interface specified in list is described. Each definition consists of three parameters separated by comma: the description of the interface and the rigid and limit values.

Put one description for each interface listed. An example would be:

<desc>
        eth0 = FastEthernet LAN, 0, 1000
        eth1 = ADSL 10Mbs Internet, 0, 1000
</desc>

The maximum number of entries allowed is 10.

gateway

This is where the network interface that acts as the gateway for this server is defined. This is mainly used if you plan to monitor network traffic usage of your devices/networks using the traffacct graph below.

    Netstat statistics (netstat.rrd)

This graph shows the state of the all network connections IPv4 and IPv6.

Only the limit and rigid values may be set here.

    System services demand (serv.rrd)

This graph requires either MailScanner or amavisd-new mail scanners in order to account spam and virus emails.

mode

This option toggles the way the System Services Demand data is represented in the graph. There are two possible values:

i for incremental style.
l for load (peaks) style.

Default value: i

    Mail statistics (mail.rrd)

This graph requires either MailScanner or amavisd-new mail scanners in order to account spam and virus emails. Spamassassin and Clamav antivirus are also used for spam and virus email accounting.

mta

This option specifies the MTA that Monitorix will use to collect mail statistics. The currently supported MTAs are:
Sendmail
Postfix

NOTE: the pflogsumm utility is required when using the Postfix MTA.

Default value: sendmail

greylist

This option specifies the Greylisting implementation that Monitorix will use to collect statistical information. In the future more Greylisting software will be supported.

The currently supported Greylist software is:

milter-greylist

Default value: milter-greylist

delvd_enabled

This section enables or disables one of the alert capabilities for this graph; the alert for the number of delivered messages. It works as follows:

If the number of delivered messages reaches the delvd_threshold value for the interval of time defined in delvd_timeintvl, Monitorix will execute the external alert script defined in delvd_script.

The default Monitorix installation includes an example of a shell-script alert called monitorix-alert.sh which you can use as a base for your own script.

Default value: n

delvd_timeintvl

This is the period of time (in seconds) that the threshold needs to be exceeded before the external alert script is executed.

Default value: 60

delvd_threshold

This is the value that needs to be reached or exceeded within the specified time period in delvd_timeintvl to trigger the mechanism for a particular action, which in this case is the execution of an external alert script.

The value of this option is compared against the number of delivered messages since the last delvd_timeintvl seconds.

Default value: 100

delvd_script

This is the full path name of the script that will be executed by this alert.

It will receive the following three parameters:

1st - the value currently defined in delvd_timeintvl.
2nd - the value currently defined in delvd_threshold.
3rd - the number of delivered messages.

Default value: /path/to/script.sh

mqueued_enabled

This section enables or disables one of the alert capabilities for this graph; the alert for the number of queued messages. It works as follows:

If the number of queued messages reaches the mqueued_threshold value for the interval of time defined in mqueued_timeintvl, Monitorix will execute the external alert script defined in mqueued_script.

The default Monitorix installation includes an example of a shell-script alert called monitorix-alert.sh which you can use as a base for your own script.

Default value: n

mqueued_timeintvl

This is the period of time (in seconds) that the threshold needs to be exceeded before the external alert script is executed.

Default value: 3600

mqueued_threshold

This is the value that needs to be reached or exceeded within the specified time period in mqueued_timeintvl to trigger the mechanism for a particular action, which in this case is the execution of an external alert script.

The value of this option is compared with the number of messages in the mail queue.

Default value: 100

mqueued_script

This is the full path name of the script that will be executed by this alert.

It will receive the following three parameters:

1st - the value currently defined in mqueued_timeintvl.
2nd - the value currently defined in mqueued_threshold.
3rd - the number of messages in the mail queue.

Default value: /path/to/script.sh

    Network port traffic (port.rrd)

This graph requires the iptables(8) command on Linux systems and the ipfw command on *BSD systems.

max

This is the number of network ports that you want to monitor. There is no limit to the number of ports monitored, but keep in mind that every time this number changes, Monitorix will resize the port.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: 9

rule

This is the rule number that Monitorix will use when using the ipfw command to manage network port activity on *BSD systems. Change it if you think it might conflict with any other rule number.

Default value: 24000

list

You may define here up to max network port numbers. If you need to monitor the same network port with TCP and UDP protocols, you can add your own suffix to the port number (e.g: 443t and 443u) in order to distinguish it from the double definition in the <desc> block.

If you see a red color in the background of a network port graph, it means that there is not a daemon listening on that port. This can be useful to know if some service gone down unexpectedly.

desc

This is the option where each network port specified in list is described. Each port definition consists of five parameters separated by comma: the port description, the network protocol, the connection type (in, out or in/out) and the rigid and limit values.

An example would be:

<desc>
        25 = SMTP, tcp, in/out, 0, 1000
        80 = HTTP, tcp, in, 0, 1000
        53 = DNS, udp, in, 0, 1000
</desc>

graphs_per_row

This is the number of graphs that will be put in a row. Consider the interaction of this parameter with the max option in order to adjust the size and number of graphs in relation to your horizontal screen size.

Default value: 3

    Users using the system (user.rrd)

Only the limit and rigid values may be set here.

    FTP statistics (ftp.rrd)

This graph supports currently ProFTPD, vsftpd and Pure-FTPd log file formats.

For best results with the ProFTPD server I recommend to add the following line in its configuration file:

ExtendedLog /var/log/proftpd/access.log AUTH,DIRS,READ,WRITE

For best results with the vsftpd server I recommend to setup the option xferlog_std_format to NO, and the option ftp_log to /var/log/vsftpd.log.

server

This option specifies the FTP server. The currently supported FTP servers are:
ProFTPD
vsftpd
Pure-FTPd

Default value: proftpd

anon_user

This option lists the different names (separated by comma) that can adopt the Anonymous user in the FTP server defined in server.

Default value: anonymous, ftp

    Apache statistics (apache.rrd)

This graph requires that mod_status be loaded and ExtendedStatus option set to On in order to collect full status information of the Apache web server.

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of local and remote Apache web servers.

list

This is a comma-separated list of URLs of the monitored Apache web servers.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the apache.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: http://localhost/server-status?auto

    Nginx statistics (nginx.rrd)

This graph may require adding some lines in the configuration file nginx.conf. Please see the README.nginx file to determine the exact steps needed to configure Nginx to get status information.

This graph requires the iptables(8) command on Linux systems, and the ipfw command on *BSD systems.

url

This is the URL to be used to collect Nginx stats.

Default value: http://localhost/nginx_status

port

This is the network port the Nginx web server is listening on.

Default value: 80

rule

This is the rule number that Monitorix will use when using the ipfw command to manage Nginx network activity on *BSD systems. Change it if you think it might conflict with any other rule number.

Default value: 24100

    Lighttpd statistics (lighttpd.rrd)

This graph requires that mod_status is loaded in order to collect status information from the Lighttpd web server.

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of local and remote Lighttpd web servers.

list

This is a comma-separated list of URLs of the monitored Lighttpd web servers.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries of this option changes, Monitorix will resize the lighttpd.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: http://localhost/server-status?auto

    MySQL statistics (mysql.rrd)

This graph requires that you create a password protected MySQL user that is NOT granted privileges on any DB.

Example:

mysql> CREATE USER ’user’@’localhost’ IDENTIFIED BY ’password’;
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

where user is the new user name and password is the password that will be used for that user.

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of local and remote MySQL web servers.

NOTE: It is strongly recommended that you restart the MySQL service in order to avoid high peaks that could prevent correct display of the first plotted data.

conn_type

This option toggles the way how Monitorix establishes the connection with the MySQL server. There are two possible values:

host using the network (hostname and IP address).
socket using a socket file.

Default value: host

list

This is a comma-separated list of hostnames or path to sockets of MySQL servers.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries of this option change Monitorix will resize the mysql.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: localhost

desc

This is the option where each entry specified in the list is described. Each definition consists of three parameters separated by comma: the port, the username and the password.

An example would be:

<desc>
        localhost = 3306, user, secret
</desc>

Some of the values shown in the graphs are the result of a calculation of two values from either SHOW [GLOBAL] STATUS or SHOW VARIABLES. The following is an explanation of them:

Thread Cache Hit Rate
(1 - (Threads_created / Connections)) * 100
When an application connects to a MySQL database, the database has to create a thread to manage the connection and the queries that will be sent in that connection. The database instructs the kernel to create a new thread, and the kernel allocates resources and creates the thread, then returns it to the MySQL service. When the connection is terminated by the application, MySQL tells the kernel to destroy the thread and free the resources. This create/destroy mechanism causes considerable overhead if the MySQL server has many new connections per second.
If MySQL doesn’t destroy the thread when the connection is terminated, but reuses it and assigns it to the next connection then this will decrease the kernel overhead. This is why a high Thread Cache Hit Rate improves MySQL performance and decreases the system’s CPU usage.
Setting the parameter thread_cache_size in the my.cnf file accordingly will help to correctly balance between having a great thread cache and keeping MySQL memory consumption reasonable.
Higher is better.

Query Cache Hit Rate
Qcache_hits / (Qcache_hits + Com_select) * 100
Higher should be considered better.
A query cache size increase is recommended if the query cache usage is very close to 100% and the query cache hit rate is far from 100%. But sometimes a size increase will not lead to a better hit rate: this means that the increase was not needed and that the application do not run enough cacheable SELECT queries.
This value should grow proportionally with the number of executed queries as long as the query cache is performing well. Please also have a look at the Query cache usage percentage to know if your query_cache configuration is appropriate.

For more information please refer to http://www.databasejournal.com/features/mysql/article.php/3808841/Optimizing-the-MySQL-Query-Cache.htm

Query Cache Usage
(1 - (Qcache_free_memory / query_cache_size)) * 100
This value should be reasonably far from 100%, otherwise consider incrementing the query_cache_size parameter in my.cnf.

Connections Usage
(Max_used_connections / max_connections) * 100
This value should be reasonably far from 100%, otherwise consider incrementing the max_connections parameter in my.cnf.

Key Buffer Usage
(Key_blocks_used / (Key_blocks_used + Key_blocks_unused)) * 100
This value should be reasonably far from 100%, otherwise consider incrementing the key_buffer_size parameter in my.cnf.

InnoDB Buffer Pool Usage
(1 - (Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_free / Innodb_buffer_pool_pages_total)) * 100
This value should be reasonably far from 100%, otherwise consider incrementing the innodb_buffer_pool_size parameter in my.cnf.

Temp. Tables To Disk
(Created_temp_disk_tables / Created_temp_disk_tables + Created_temp_tables)) * 100
During operation, MySQL has to create some temporary tables (that can be explicit, so created by the web application, or implicit, so for example MySQL has to create one when he runs some "SELECT DISTINCT", "UNION" or "VIEW" queries). MySQL will prefer to save this tmp tables to memory, for a fast access. But if tmp_table_size gets saturated, he has to write them on the disk instead, making the access slower.
Note that if you modify the value of tmp_table_size in the MySQL configuration file, you should also modify the value of max_heap_table_size as well, since both values should have the same value because MySQL uses the minimum of both, so raising one of them is useless.
Therefore this value helps to know how many tmp tables go to the disk instead than to the memory. Keep in mind that some large queries, involving TEXT and BLOB columns, are directly written to the disk instead than to the memory, because they would be too big. So you probably will want to avoid having a high % of tmp tables written to the disk, but you will never reach 0% on a big site, and this is fine.
Lower is better ... but 0% is not reachable and you should not try to reach it, usually.

    Squid Proxy Web Cache (squid.rrd)

cmd

This command displays statistics about the Squid HTTP proxy process and is the main command used to collect all data.

Default value: squidclient -h 127.0.0.1

graph_0
graph_1
These two lists hold the selected Squid result or status codes to be shown in each graph. Feel free to mix result status and code status in any of the two options.

For more information about the list of all the result and status codes, please refer to http://wiki.squid-cache.org/SquidFaq/SquidLogs.

Each graph has a limit number of 9 entries.

    NFS server statistics (nfss.rrd)

version

This option specifies which NFS server version is running in the system in order to correctly gather the correct values.

The possible values are:

2 for NFS v2.
3 for NFS v3.
4 for NFS v4.

Default value: 3

graph_0
graph_1
graph_2
These three lists hold the defined NFS server activity statistics to be shown in each graph. Put every statistic name exactly as they appear in the output of the nfsstat(8) command.

Each graph has a limit number of 10 entries.

    NFS client statistics (nfsc.rrd)

version

This option specifies which NFS server version is running in the system in order to correctly gather the correct values.

The possible values are:

2 for NFS v2.
3 for NFS v3.
4 for NFS v4.

Default value: 3

graph_1
graph_2
graph_3
graph_4
graph_5
These five lists hold the defined NFS client activity statistics to be shown in each graph. Put every statistic name exactly as they appear in the output of the nfsstat(8) command.

Each graph has the following limit number of entries:

graph_1 up to 10 entries.
graph_2 up to 10 entries.
graph_3 up to 4 entries.
graph_4 up to 4 entries.
graph_5 up to 4 entries.

    BIND statistics (bind.rrd)

This graph requires a BIND server with version 9.5 or higher, and in order to see all statistics provided by BIND you must configure the statistics-channels option like this:
statistics-channels {
        inet 127.0.0.1 port 8053;
};

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of BIND servers.

list

This is a comma-separated list of URLs of BIND servers status pages.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the bind.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: http://localhost:8053/

in_queries_list

This is a comma-separated list of RR (Resource Records) types for each BIND server specified in list option. The RR types defined here will appear in the Incoming Queries graph which shows the number of incoming queries for each RR type.

For a complete list of RR types check the BIND 9 Administrator Reference Manual at <http://ftp.isc.org/www/bind/arm95/Bv9ARM.html>.

<in_queries_list>
        http://localhost:8053/ = A, AAAA, ANY, DS, MX, NS, PTR, SOA, SRV, TXT, NAPTR, A6, CNAME, SPF, KEY, DNSKEY, HINFO, WKS, PX, NSAP
</in_queries_list>

The maximum number of RR types allowed for this graph is 20.

out_queries_list

This is a comma-separated list of RR (Resource Records) types for each BIND server. The RR types defined here will appear in the Outgoing Queries graph (_default view) which shows the number of outgoing queries sent by the DNS server resolver for each RR type.

<out_queries_list>
        http://localhost:8053/ = A, AAAA, ANY, DS, MX, NS, PTR, SOA, SRV, TXT, NAPTR, A6, CNAME, SPF, KEY, DNSKEY, HINFO, WKS, PX, NSAP
</out_queries_list>

The maximum number of RR types allowed for this graph is 20.

server_stats_list

This is a comma-separated list of counters about incoming request processing. The counters defined here will appear in the Server Statistics graph.

<server_stats_list>
        http://localhost:8053/ = Requestv4, Requestv6, ReqEdns0, ReqBadEDNSVer, ReqTSIG, ReqSIG0, ReqBadSIG, ReqTCP, Response, QrySuccess, QryAuthAns, QryNoauthAns, QryReferral, QryNxrrset, QrySERVFAIL, QryNXDOMAIN, QryRecursion, QryDuplicate, QryDropped, QryFailure
</server_stats_list>

The maximum number of counters allowed for this graph is 20.

resolver_stats_list

This is a comma-separated list of counters about name resolution performed in the internal resolver. The counters defined here will appear in the Resolver Statistics graph (_default view).

<resolver_stats_list>
        http://localhost:8053/ = Queryv4, Queryv6, Responsev4, Responsev6, NXDOMAIN, SERVFAIL, FORMERR, OtherError, EDNS0Fail, Truncated, Lame, Retry, QueryTimeout, GlueFetchv4, GlueFetchv6, GlueFetchv4Fail, GlueFetchv6Fail, ValAttempt, ValOk, ValNegOk
</resolver_stats_list>

The maximum number of counters allowed for this graph is 20.

cache_rrsets_list

This is a comma-separated list of RR (Resource Records) types for each BIND server. The RR types defined here will appear in the Cache DB RRsets graph (_default view) which shows the number of RRsets per RR type (positive or negative) and nonexistent names stored in the cache database.

<cache_rrsets_list>
        http://localhost:8053/ = A, !A, AAAA, !AAAA, DLV, !DLV, DS, !DS, MX, NS, CNAME, !CNAME, SOA, !SOA, !ANY, PTR, RRSIG, NSEC, DNSKEY, NXDOMAIN
</cache_rrsets_list>

The maximum number of RR types allowed for this graph is 20.

    NTP statistics (ntp.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of NTP servers.

list

This is a comma-separated list of NTP servers.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the ntp.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: localhost

desc

This is a list of groups of Reference Identifier and Kiss-o’-Death Codes for every hostname specified in the list option.

For more information on these NTP codes:
<http://www.iana.org/assignments/ntp-parameters/ntp-parameters.xml>
<http://www.iana.org/go/rfc5905>

<desc>
        localhost = AUTH, AUTO, CRYP, DENY, GPS, INIT, NKEY, RATE, RMOT, RSTR
</desc>

The maximum number of codes allowed for each hostname is 10.

    Fail2ban statistics (fail2ban.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of Fail2ban jails.

list

This is a comma-separated list that describes the groups of jails in desc. Put one description for each group. For every group specified you need to specify its description in the desc option.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the fail2ban.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

An example would be:

list = Security, Overload / Abuse

desc

This is a list of jails per group defined in your Fail2ban configuration.

<desc>
        0 = [apache], [apache-mod-security], [apache-overflows], [courierauth], [ssh], [pam-generic], [php-url-fopen], [vsftpd]
        1 = [apache-imdbphp], [apache-evasive], [apache-badbots], [apache-robots-txt], [communigate], [named-refused-udp], [named-refused-tcp], [trac-ticketspam]
</desc>

The maximum number of jails allowed for each group is 9.

graphs_per_row

This is the number of fail2ban graphs that will be put in a row.

Default value: 2

    Icecast Streaming Media Server (icecast.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of Icecast servers.

list

This is a list of URLs of Icecast server status pages.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the icecast.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: http://localhost:8000/status.xsl

desc

This is a comma-separated list of mountpoints configured for every URL specified in the list option.

<desc>
        http://localhost:8000/status.xsl = stream1, stream2, stream3
</desc>

The maximum number of mountpoints allowed for each URL is 9.

graph_mode

This changes the layout of the listeners graph, the possible values are r for a real graph, or s for a stacked graph (every line or area is stacked on top of the previous element).

Default value: r

    Raspberry Pi sensor statistics (raspberrypi.rrd)

For more information please refer to http://elinux.org/RPI_vcgencmd_usage.

cmd

This is where the vcgencmd command is installed.

Default value: /opt/vc/bin/vcgencmd

clocks

This is a comma-separated list of clock types that will be represented in the first graph.

An example would be:

clocks = arm, core, h264, isp, v3d, uart, emmc, pixel, hdmi

The maximum number of clocks allowed is 9.

volts

This is a comma-separated list of voltage types that will be represented in the third graph.

An example would be:

volts = core, sdram_c, sdram_i, sdram_p

The maximum number of clocks allowed is 6.

    Alternative PHP Cache statistics (phpapc.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of PHP-APC installations.

list

This is a comma-separated list of URLs of PHP-APC status pages.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the phpapc.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: http://localhost/apc.php?auto

    Memcached statistics (memcached.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of Memcached installations.

list

This is a comma-separated list of hostnames with network port running Memcached.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the memcached.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: localhost:11211

    APC UPS statistics (apcupsd.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of APC UPS (apcupsd) installations.

cmd

This is the command that will be used (with the values in list) to get the statistics.

Default value: apcaccess

list

This is a comma-separated list of hostnames with the network port running apcupsd.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the apcupsd.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: localhost:3551

    Wowza Media Server (wowza.rrd)

This graph is able to monitor an unlimited number of Wowza servers.

list

This is a comma-separated list of URLs of Wowza server status pages.

WARNING: Every time the number of entries in this option changes, Monitorix will resize the wowza.rrd file accordingly, removing all historical data.

Default value: http://localhost:8086/connectioncounts

desc

This is a comma-separated list of applications configured for every URL specified in the list option.

<desc>
        http://localhost:8086/connectioncounts = channel1, channel2, channel3
</desc>

The maximum number of applications allowed for each URL is 8.

    Devices interrupt activity (int.rrd)

Only the limit and rigid values may be set here.

    Monitoring the Internet traffic of your LAN (traffacct.rrd)

If your server acts as the gateway for a group of PCs, devices or even whole networks in your local LAN, you may want to know how much Internet traffic each one is generating.

This graph requires the iptables(8) command on GNU/Linux systems, and the ipfw command on *BSD systems.

The following are the options you will need to configure to accomplish all of this.

enabled

This option enables this feature.

Default value: n

max

This is the number of LAN devices you want to monitor. There is no limit, but keep in mind that every time this number changes, Monitorix will resize the traffacct.rrd file, removing all historical data.

Default value: 10

graphs_per_row

If your horizontal screen resolution is pretty wide, you may want to increase the number of graphs that appear on each row.

Default value: 2

list

This is a comma-separated list of names of PCs, LAN devices or whole networks that you want to monitor. The only requirement is that all they must utilize this server as their gateway.

If the names in this list are able to be resolved by a DNS query then you don’t need to define the desc list (below) with corresponding IP addresses, unless you want monthly reports.

An example would be:

list = pc8, printer, scanner, lan3

desc

This is the list of IP addresses with network masks and email addresses corresponding to the entries defined in the list. This option is only used when the those entries are not resolvable through a DNS query.

An example would be:

<desc>
        0 = 192.168.1.101/32, ace@example.com
        1 = 192.168.1.102/32, gene@example.com
        2 = 192.168.1.103/32, paul@example.com
        3 = 192.168.1.104/32, peter@example.com
</desc

    Monthly reports of Internet traffic (traffacct.rrd)

enabled
If this option is set to y, Monitorix will send a report of all the monthly Internet activity of the defined devices in list to the specified email address on the first day of each month.

Default value: n

language

Define here the language used in the monthly report.

The possible values are: ca, de, en, it, pl and zh_CN.

Default value: en

default_mail

This is the default email address used to send the monthly reports. This option is only used if the second parameter in desc list is empty.

Default value: root@localhost

url_prefix

This is the prefix of the same URL you use to connect to Monitorix. This is needed in order to get the graphs of the same machine.

Default value: http://localhost:8080

smtp_hostname

This is the hostname that will be used as a SMTP relay to deliver the monthly report emails.

Default value: localhost

from_address

This is the address that will be used as remitent for all the monthly report emails.

Default value: noreply@example.com

    Monitoring remote servers (Multihost)

The Multihost feature allows you to monitor an unlimitted number of remote servers that already have Monitorix installed. Make sure that all servers (local and remote) have the same version of Monitorix, otherwise there would be some incompatibilities that would prevent showing correctly the graphs.

enabled

This option enables the Multihost feature.

Default value: n

footer_url

If set to y Monitorix will show the original URL of each server at the bottom of the graph. Where security is important you may want to hide this information.

Default value: y

graphs_per_row

If your horizontal screen resolution is pretty wide, you may want to increase the number of graphs that appear on each row.

Default value: 2

remotehost_list

This is a comma-separated list with descriptive names of remote servers with Monitorix already installed and working that you plan to monitor from here.

An example of this list would be:

remotehost_list = server 1, server 2, server 3

remotehost_desc

This is a numbered list that describes each of the names defined in the remotehost_list option and the remote values of base_url and base_cgi options.

An example would be:

<remotehost_desc>
        0 = http://www.example.com,/monitorix,/monitorix-cgi
        1 = http://10.0.0.1,/monitorix,/monitorix-cgi
        2 = http://192.168.0.100:8080,/,/
</remotehost_desc>

As you can see all these three entries use URLs to designate the location of each remote server. This means that each server most also have been enabled the built-in HTTP server, or have been installed a CGI capable web server like Apache.

groups

This enables the server grouping for those environments where there are too much servers to display at the same time. Hence, you can group them in order to show them separatedly.

Default value: n

remotegroup_list

This is a list of groups of remote servers with Monitorix already installed and working that you plan to monitor from here.

An example of this list would be:

remotegroup_list = My Group

remotegroup_desc

This is a numbered list that describes each of the names defined in the remotegroup_list option.

An example would be:

<remotegroup_desc>
        0 = server2, server 3
</remotegroup_desc>

    Automatic email reports (emailreports)

This allows to send automatically selected graphs to one or more email addresses. This could be specially useful for some system administrators who prefer receiving via email selected graphs instead of browsing to the remote servers every day.

enabled

This option enables this feature. Note that you still need to enable the same option for each time interval you want to activate: daily, weekly, monthly, yearly.

Default value: n

url_prefix

This is the prefix of the same URL you use to connect to Monitorix. This is needed in order to get the graphs of the same machine.

Default value: http://localhost:8080

smtp_hostname

This is the hostname that will be used as a SMTP relay to deliver the automatic email reports.

from_address

This is the address that will be used as remitent for all the monthly report emails.

Default value: noreply@example.com

hour

This is the hour (in 24h format) when the email reports will be sent.

Default value: 0

minute

This is the minute when the email reports will be sent.

Default value: 0

daily
weekly
monthly
yearly

The email reports are sent based on the following schedule:

daily reports will be sent every day at 00:00h.
weekly reports will be sent the first Monday of each week.
monthly reports will be sent the first day of each month.
yearly reports will be sent the first day of each year.

enabled

This option enables each report individually.

Default value: n

graphs

This is a comma-separated list of graph names you want to appear in the email report. The names are the same as their .rrd files. There is a list of them in the graph_name option in monitorix.conf.

Default value: system, fs

to

This is a comma-separated list of recipient email addresses.

addendum_script

This is the full path name of an external script that will be executed during the creation of the report, and its output will be appended to the mail. This is useful for system administrators that want to add extra system information to the reports.

Default value: none

    rigid and limit values

rigid
This value defines how the graph must be scaled. Its possible values are:

0 No rigid. The graph will be scaled automatically.
2 The graph will be scaled using the limit value as its upper-limit value.

limit

This is where you can enter the upper-limit value for a graph.

AUTHOR

Monitorix is written by Jordi Sanfeliu <jordi@fibranet.cat>

COPYRIGHT

Copyright © 2005-2014 Jordi Sanfeliu
Licensed under the GNU General Public License version 2 (GPLv2).

SEE ALSO

monitorix(8), rrdtool(1)


3.5.0 monitorix.conf (5) "Mar 2014"
Generated by manServer 1.07 from monitorix.conf.5 using man macros.